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Sunday, February 23

  1. page Movies edited Click here for a list of movies for psych majors on Amazon. PsychMovies.com 9 Movies about Memor…
    Click here for a list of movies for psych majors on Amazon.
    PsychMovies.com
    9 Movies about Memory Manipulation and How They Inspired Real Neuroscience
    12 Angry Men (Social psychological concepts)
    About Schmidt (Issues faced in older adulthood)
    (view changes)
    7:55 pm

Thursday, August 29

  1. page Resources edited ... PsyBlog - Review of current psychological research by a researcher at University College Londo…
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    PsyBlog - Review of current psychological research by a researcher at University College London.
    Research Resources
    [[rss url="https://www.diigo.com/rss/user/Tgalvez/psychology%20research%20resource" link="true" number="20"]]
    Other Resources
    Movies (Movies that directly deal with some kind of psychological issue in a character or society)
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    2:24 am

Thursday, March 22

  1. page Treatment_Carly edited ... {Efweiorwejfoijwef.png} Home {Erin_DeMay.JPG} (DeMay) Obsessive-compulsive disorder (O…
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    Home
    {Erin_DeMay.JPG} (DeMay)
    Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is known as an “anxiety disorder in which a person has an unreasonable thought, fear, or worry that he/she tries to manage by performing a ritual activity to reduce the anxiety”. Obsessions are disturbing thoughts that are frequent, and the actions that are repeated to represAs or dispel these obsessions are called compulsions. In 2009, the International OCD Foundation reported that “one out of 100 adults has obsessive-compulsive disorder. Although there is not a full understanding of OCD and where it comes from (etiologies), and “is rarely brought into full remission, its symptoms…can often be alleviated by biomedical or psychosocial treatments” ("Psychosocial Treatments for OCD" ).
    The biomedical therapies that are available to treat disorders are psychotherapeutic drugs (antianxiety drugs, antidepressants, and antipsychotics), electroconvulsive therapy and psychosurgery. Antidepressants are most commonly tried first on a person suffering from OCD as it helps “increase levels of serotonin, which you may be lacking when [one] has OCD”. The antidepressants (also known as selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors or SSRIs) that have been approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for the treatment of OCD are, to name a few: Clomipramine (Anafranil), Fluvoxamine (Luvox), Fluoxetine (Prozac), Paroxetine (Paxil, Pexeva), Seteraline (Zoloft) (Mayo Clinic Staff). Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT), where a “patient is anesthetized and a small amount of electrical current is used to stimulate the brain [which] produces a modified seizure, which, in turn, changes activity of the brain”, is also used to treat OCD (Seiner). ECT is used for patients whom have not responded to medications and therapy, but it is rarely used because it is “reserved for patients who also have severe depression” (“Biomedical Treatments for OCD”). Another treatment that is usually reserved for patients with which other treatments have failed is deep brain stimulation, a treatment where “a device is implanted in the upper chest with wires that connect to the ventral capsule/ventral striatum and stimulate it, [since] this area of the brain is thought to be correlated with” OCD (“Biomedical Treatments for OCD”). Although there are people with OCD who benefit from biomedical therapies such as SSRIs, ECT and deep brain stimulation, there are many people who do not that “are left with residual symptoms and lead constricted lives” ("Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD) Research Clinic"). This would mean that they are subjecting their bodies to treatments that could have negative psychological and physical effects for no reason. The biomedical therapies have shown enough success that they are still in use, but because there are a number of people who cannot be treated we cannot settle with just the biomedical therapies that we have today, but continue to look for the etiology of OCD so that people with the anxiety disorder will be able to lead full lives and not be affected by their symptoms.
    In a study done at Tufts University by Wald Dodman and Shuster, the effects of a combination of memantine and fluoxetine on animal models of OCD, which are SSRIs. In the model of OCD, “compulsive scratching is induced by a subcutaneous injection of serotonin or a serotonin releasing agent… in the back of the neck.” The results showed that the effects of the two SSRIs “were found to be synergistic, specifically as defined by an isoblogram”. The results of the study showed that with a combination of the two drugs, the animal model of OCD showed “a significant reduction in compulsive scratching was observed only with fluoxetine doses of 15 and 30 mg/kg. The results of the study highlight that although the symptoms of OCD cannot be cured by the drugs, they can be quite helpful in alleviating symptoms and show promise in a possible road to recovery (Wald).
    Individual and group treatment of OCD is usually approached in therapy. There are many different types of therapy that are used, mostly to ease or control the unpleasant thoughts and compulsions and rectify them. The different types of therapy most often used are cognitive behavior therapy (CBT), exposure and response prevention therapy, group therapy, family therapy and in extreme cases people use psychoanalysis or are hospitalized. CBT is a type of therapy that is designed to “alter the repetitive unpleasant thoughts and control or cease the compulsive behavior”. In CBT, the patients are encouraged to help themselves recover on their own, and are taught more effective techniques to deal with obsessions and compulsions. Exposure and response prevention therapy is a form of CBT that exposes the patient with the situation which induces the symptoms of the disorder, and then they are “not allowed to perform the ritualistic behavior that alleviates [their] anxiety”. The goal is that the patient will eventually learn that there are no bad consequences that come from
    {Sukianto_Hamzah.JPG} (Hamzah)
    not performing their ritualistic behavior. Group therapy is good for patients so that they can interact with others that also suffer from OCD, and that they are not the only one affected by the disorder. Group therapy is not as common as CBT. Family therapy is used for families who have someone who suffers from OCD, “as the entire family can become maladjusted due to the illness”. The family and the patient are taught how to deal with the symptoms, and are educated about the disorder and instructs the family to introduce tasks into the environment that the patient irrationally avoids ("Psychosocial Treatments for OCD"). As noted before, there are some people that do not respond to biomedical or therapeutic treatments of OCD, but while research continues to discover better treatments for the disorder, therapy that shows sufferers of OCD that there are others who are like them as well as introduces support and coping techniques can improve lives and assists with emotional stress, which biomedical treatments may not.
    In 1998 at the University of Michigan, Fischer, Himle and Hanna conducted a 7 week group therapy clinical trial to “evaluate the efficiency of…behavioral therapy program for adolescents with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). 15 adolescents participated in group exposure and response prevention therapy and were assisted by a therapist who provided the participants with information about OCD, prevention exercises, and gave behavioral homework. In the study, “an additional family session was conducted to educate families about OCD and to encourage participation in the group member’s behavioral program”. At the end of the study, each of the participants showed significant improvement on their Yale-Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale scores and the “6-month follow-up revealed further improvement. [The] findings provide preliminary support for the efficacy of group behavioral therapy for adolescents with OCD” (Fischer). The results of this study show the significant effects on patients of OCD even after treatment has finished, showing that OCD can be treated individually (outside of therapy) as well as in a group setting, and that it has proven effective to relieve most symptoms.
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    1:00 am
  2. page Carly edited ... By Carly W. {Handwash.jpg} {bipolar.png} (Malmqvist) (Booyabazooka) (Booyabazooka) …
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    By Carly W.
    {Handwash.jpg} {bipolar.png}
    (Malmqvist)
    (Booyabazooka)
    (Booyabazooka)
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    Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is known as an “anxiety disorder in which a person has an unreasonable thought, fear, or worry that he/she tries to manage by performing a ritual activity to reduce the anxiety”. Obsessions are disturbing thoughts that are frequent, and the actions that are repeated to repress or dispel these obsessions are called compulsions. In 2009, the International OCD Foundation reported that “one out of 100 adults has obsessive-compulsive disorder.
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    *For the links low, click on the title, not the picture for the article*
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    DSM-IV (1999)! (Masoner)
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    {Microbe_World.JPG} Ever wonder what the causes for Bipolar Disorder and OCD are? Find out here! (Microbe World)
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    12:58 am
  3. page Carly edited ... {Handwash.jpg} {bipolar.png} (Malmqvist) Booyabazooka) (Booyabazooka) {OCD.png} Ob…
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    {Handwash.jpg} {bipolar.png}
    (Malmqvist)
    Booyabazooka)(Booyabazooka)
    {OCD.png}
    Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is known as an “anxiety disorder in which a person has an unreasonable thought, fear, or worry that he/she tries to manage by performing a ritual activity to reduce the anxiety”. Obsessions are disturbing thoughts that are frequent, and the actions that are repeated to repress or dispel these obsessions are called compulsions. In 2009, the International OCD Foundation reported that “one out of 100 adults has obsessive-compulsive disorder.
    (view changes)
    12:57 am
  4. page Carly edited ... By Carly W. {Handwash.jpg} {bipolar.png} (Malmqvist) Booyabazooka) {OCD.png} ... …
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    By Carly W.
    {Handwash.jpg} {bipolar.png}
    (Malmqvist)
    Booyabazooka)

    {OCD.png}
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    obsessive-compulsive disorder.
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    As defined by the National Institute of Mental Health:
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    {Richard_Masoner.Cyclelicious.JPG} Want to know the symptoms of OCD or Bipolar Disorder? Read this list that was compiled based on the DSM-IV (1999)!
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    out here! (Microbe World)
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    to treatment (DeMay, Untitled)
    {RbwTE.png} Are treatments developed based on etiologies? What happens if the certain etiologies are unknown, and there are only theories about what causes OCD? Find out the relationship between etiology and treatment here.
    {sources.png} Sources for all research studies, information and images here.
    (view changes)
    12:56 am

Tuesday, March 20

  1. page Abnormal edited ... (#9) Examine biomedical, individual, and group approaches to the treatment of one disorder. (…
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    (#9) Examine biomedical, individual, and group approaches to the treatment of one disorder.
    (#12) Discuss the relationship between etiology and therapeutic approach in relation to one disorder.
    {Abnormal Psych Unit Project.docx}
    Alex (Bipolar & OCD)
    Akane (OCD & Anorexia)
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    8:45 pm
  2. page Depression edited {Depression.PNG} ... Badger Waffle from Flickr What is Depression? What causes Depression…
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    Badger Waffle from Flickr
    What is Depression?
    What causes Depression? (Etiologies)
    What kind of treatments are available for Depression?
    Can depression be caused by different factors? If so, how should each be treated?
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    By: shattered.art66 from Flickr
    Video Provided
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    was unclear.
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mlNCavst2EU
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    ==
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    By: J'Roo from Flickr
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    What is Obsessive Compulsive Disorder?
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    (Etiologies)
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    Ryan Leighty from Flickr
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    Sources
    (view changes)
    6:43 pm
  3. page space.menu edited ... Resources Get Psyched! Blog Psych Journal
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    Resources
    Get Psyched! Blog
    Psych Journal
    (view changes)
    6:41 pm

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